Historical Crime Week: Why I Love Historical Crime by S D Sykes

We’re handing over control of our blog to author S D Sykes for the next five days as we celebrate everything we love about historical crime. Look out for more exclusive blogs here throughout the week and don’t forget to follow @cbbookgroup on Twitter for your chance to win one of five signed copies of S D Sykes’s debut novel, Plague Land.

“Why historical crime?” we hear you ask…well, we’ll let our host will explain…

Colour head and shoulders crop“It’s historical crime week at the Curtis Brown reading group so, as host, I’m going to use this opportunity to shamelessly promote my own particular genre. Now, I know there are some among you who remain resistant to its charms. I sometimes meet you at book clubs or library talks, when you saunter over to me with an expression of embarrassment, even guilt, written across your face. You often won’t make eye contact as you then spill out your confession. ‘I don’t usually read historical crime,’ you admit, before leaning over conspiratorially. ‘But I did enjoy your book.’

So, how can I convince more of you to try it out? To become proud readers of historical crime fiction. Because the genre is home to some truly excellent writing. Firstly, if you love the cut and thrust of contemporary crime, then there’s absolutely nothing not to love about historical crime. Our novels bear all the same fundamental characteristics. In short, there’s a murder, an investigation and a resolution.

If there is a difference, then it’s this. The investigator, and I use this word rather than detective, does not have the tools of modern day policing at his or her disposal. Most novels are set before any sort of police force came into being, and there is certainly no forensic science to rely upon – other than perhaps an understanding of poisonous herbs or the characteristics of rigor mortis. Personally, I love this aspect of historical crime. The murder can only be solved by the deduction of clues. The cross-examination of suspects, and the scrutiny of personality. By logic, combined with sudden bursts of insight. It’s all the stuff of great novels… without a lab coat or DNA swab in sight.

There’s also the history to consider. I have a feeling that readers sometimes believe that historical fiction is not for them, as it says nothing about their lives. I tend to feel the opposite. The more I research into my own period of interest, the 14th century, the more I can identify with people from the past. Reading the works of Boccaccio or Chaucer, both written in the 1300s, I endlessly come across the same people I meet in my contemporary life. Humans remain what they have always been, a complex mixture of emotions, desires, neuroses and selflessness. I find this reassuring.

What’s different, of course, is the environment. But once again, this is another aspect of the genre to love. I’m reading a fast-paced, gripping crime novel, but I’m also running through a crowded street in 18th century London, or I’m sitting in the refectory of a monastery, and perhaps I’m discussing the politics of the Catholic church in the middle ages, or I’m just gossiping about the rotten food or the state of the latrines. There is a misconception that historical fiction is either about battles, the royal family, or involves the copious ripping of bodices. I’m not saying that these books don’t exist, but there is so much more. My own favourite novels tell the story of ordinary people, their struggles for survival in the days before medicine, education and democracy. And good historical fiction doesn’t throw the history at you in crude spoonfuls, instead it allows the world to gently envelop you and transport you effortlessly into the past. You learn stuff, without even trying.

So I say. Go on. Don’t be embarrassed. Give it a try.”

S D Sykes’s debut novel Plague Land, the first in the Oswald De Lacey series, will be published by Hodder in paperback on 21st May 2015. Follow S D Sykes on Twitter at @SD_Sykes and find out more about Plague Land and the Oswald De Lacey series at sdsykes.co.uk.

For your chance to win one of five signed copies of the book, visit @CBBookGroup on Twitter between 18th and 22nd May and look out for one of our competition tweets.

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